Thursday, September 27, 2007

Work in Progress

Another 4x6’er in the works. The photo isn’t the greatest but you get the idea. This is painted & inked hand dyed fabric with foiling and hand embroidery added. It will also have embellished fabric rods attached – maybe with some of those tres cool, vintage, clear sequins I found.

You know, I wish there were a huge demand for 4x6 textile art. For some reason these measurements & I get along really well. I could make this little gem size all day long. But I know that in order to reach my art goals I need to start working bigger more often. I don’t think I’ll ever produce really large work but geez…I might need to at least get into the double digits!

6 comments:

Kim Hambric said...

Denise, I love your artwork - it is so luminous. Can't wait to see the finished "work in progess". I noticed your work on your ETSY site and was wondering how your work was selling there (especially since some was in an "upper" price range). Looking forward to visiting your blog again!

Wild Thread Studio said...

Kim,
Thanks for stopping by...I know your work and like it very much! Can you click into my profile at the top of this page and then click on email and send me and email? Oh wait, I'll access you through ebay. Would love to speak with you.
Denise

Karen Stiehl Osborn said...

This is another great piece! I love what you are doing with the layers and paint --- very different from my work, but I love it!

Quilt Pixie said...

double digits are over rated -- hey you could just put 4 -- 4X6's together into one piece....

Lazy Gal Tonya said...

I was thinking the same thing as Pixie. I love everything about working on a small size - there can be magic to it. In it. I don't know what your art goals are (sales, shows) but I think you could certainly manage something incredible. Susan Shie used to make lots of little small quilts and then just whip them together. Or keep them small and frame them as gorgeous works of art.

Exuberant Color said...

Some things just have to be done on small intimate pieces. If you do little details on a large piece they don't have anywhere near the impact that they have on small pieces.